A is for Allergies as Students Head Back to School

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As students head back to class, ragweed allergies are expected to flare. Hay fever symptoms, such as itchy skin, watery eyes, sneezing and coughing can make it hard for a student to concentrate on class work. Unfortunately, it can also be difficult for parents to determine if a child has an allergy or picked up a viral infection after going back to school.

Is it Allergies or a Cold? Here Are Some Key Differences:

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), there are some clear signs that signal a child is having an allergic reaction and not suffering from a cold.

  1. While symptoms may be similar to colds, seasonal allergies usually last longer than two weeks and tend to occur at the same time each year.
  2. Dry, itchy skin or a rash is a common symptom with some allergens.
  3. If a child presents with a cough at night or when exercising, he or she may also be suffering from asthma.
  4. An allergy to food often presents with an itching or tingling in the mouth, throat or ears. Parents should make sure school nurses and teachers are informed if a child must avoid certain foods before they go back to school this year. AAP recommends staying up-to-date on lunch room menus and packing a kid’s meal when necessary.

Study-up on Ragweed Allergy Treatments before Sending Kids Back to School

If a student shows signs of asthma or allergies around the same time he or she heads back to school, it’s possible that ragweed is the culprit. However, AAP recommends that parents visit an allergist to identify exactly what it is their future honor student is allergic to. The organization explains that an important step in reducing symptoms is simply avoiding the trigger. However, it’s very hard to avoid ragweed because it grows throughout the country and easily makes its way indoors.

For children with an allergy to pollen, dust or other airborne particles, keeping irritants out of the house is essential. Whole-house air purifiers can trap pollen in a home’s indoor air, so kids can breathe easier while studying. Also trapped are viruses and bacteria, which kids are sure to bring into the house more often after they go back to school.

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